posts tagged "world"

flatbear:

sigridellis:

satedanbadass:

Jason Momoa and Manu Bennett at Florida Super Con

Those two are both Maori, right? And they are goofily pulling semi-haka-referential moves in these photos, right?

Jason Momoa is Hawaiian, raised in Iowa. Manu Bennet is Australian/Maori (Ngāti Kahungunu and Te Arawa, which is tangentially related to my Iwi).

Manu in particular is referring some classic intimidation poses, especially the tongue (A lot of Maori tribes have a cool genetic trait where the connective skin underneath their tongue is much smaller, or not there at all, to further the intimidation. Mine goes out super far!), and Jason could be doing the same, or referring to native Hawaiian intimidation poses, which I am not familiar with.

A lot of the pacific island cultures are connected and have their own Hakas, Samoan, Fijian, Vanuatan, Tongan and more, all with different names. The one Manu is most likely referencing is Ka Mate, Te Rauparaha’s Haka (also my Iwi/tribe!), the most well known one, which looks like this.

This has been your daily dose of OH MY GOD SOMEONE IS TALKING ABOUT MY TINY COUNTRY LET ME IMMEDIATELY TELL YOU EVERYTHING I KNOW.

micdotcom:

7 huge problems left by the World Cup in Brazil

 The long list of controversies before the tournament’s start included mass evictions, violent protests, police brutality and construction worker deaths. But now that the party is over, the buzz about the games is mostly good, and the problems that the media once covered with such concern are slowly being swept under the rug. 

Read more

awkwardsituationist:

thirteen year old ashol pan is part of a nascent movement of girls who are keeping alive the six thousand year old kazakh tradition of golden eagle hunting known as berkutchy.

though long the monopoly of boys — once deemed uniquely strong enough to carry a full grown eagle on their arms and endure harsh winter hunts — fewer are now learning the skill, abandoning their traditional semi nomadic ways for life in the cities.

berkutchy is a life long profession, and is often a hereditary one. but ashol’s brother left for the military, leaving her father, an experienced eagle hunter, to ask if she would take his place and assume training.

asher svidensky — who took these photos during a four month trek in the mountains of western mongolia’s bayan ulgii (or “rich cradle”) province, where only 250 hunters remain — told the bbc that where most boys are at first apprehensive around their eagles, ashol was very much at ease.

ashol, though still in school, will spend much of her time nurturing her eagle, imprinting herself on the fiercely independent bird from birth. after much time and training, her eagle — who is considered a member of the family — will learn to track down rabbits, foxes and wolves, whose fur is needed for the harsh winters.

koreaunderground:

Koreans were included in the controversial Yasukuni shrine without family permission, their descendents want them out

“This person has been waiting for seventy years. Why are you doing this?”
“Since we are the defendants and you are the plaintiff in an ongoing trial, we are unable to give an interview,” a representative for Yasukuni Shrine said.
It was 11 am on July 10, and a group of Koreans was standing in front of the gate to the Yasukuni Shrine in Tokyo. Facing firm resistance of the shrine’s employees, Park Nam-soon, 71, and those who were with her were unable to advance any further. Park had come to the shrine to find out how her father had been forcibly enshrined there.
Park and her family members desperately want to know why their father’s name had been listed at the shrine without permission from the family in advance or even notifying them after the fact, but these questions bounced off the wall of the shrine and lingered in the air. The shrine maintains that it cannot discuss matters that are currently under trial.
“The family members have come all the way from Korea. Why don’t you answer them with a little more respect?” said Akihiko Oguchi, venting his frustration, but in the end he could not change the shrine’s stubborn position. Oguchi is the attorney representing the plaintiffs suing to have their relatives’ names removed from Yasukuni Shrine.
[read more]

koreaunderground:

Koreans were included in the controversial Yasukuni shrine without family permission, their descendents want them out

“This person has been waiting for seventy years. Why are you doing this?”

“Since we are the defendants and you are the plaintiff in an ongoing trial, we are unable to give an interview,” a representative for Yasukuni Shrine said.

It was 11 am on July 10, and a group of Koreans was standing in front of the gate to the Yasukuni Shrine in Tokyo. Facing firm resistance of the shrine’s employees, Park Nam-soon, 71, and those who were with her were unable to advance any further. Park had come to the shrine to find out how her father had been forcibly enshrined there.

Park and her family members desperately want to know why their father’s name had been listed at the shrine without permission from the family in advance or even notifying them after the fact, but these questions bounced off the wall of the shrine and lingered in the air. The shrine maintains that it cannot discuss matters that are currently under trial.

“The family members have come all the way from Korea. Why don’t you answer them with a little more respect?” said Akihiko Oguchi, venting his frustration, but in the end he could not change the shrine’s stubborn position. Oguchi is the attorney representing the plaintiffs suing to have their relatives’ names removed from Yasukuni Shrine.

[read more]

anthrocentric:

Remains of ancient child ceremoniously reburied

WILSALL — On a sagebrush hillside in the Shields River Valley, close to the hem of the Crazy Mountains, the 12,600-year old remains of an infant boy were ceremoniously reburied on Saturday morning by American Indian tribal members.
The boy was between 1 year and 18 months old when he died of an unknown cause in an age of mammoth hunters.
“I hope that this is the final closure for you, too, as it is for us,” said Crow tribal elder Thomas Larson Medicine Horse Sr., addressing the Anzick family on whose property the child was discovered.
He spoke while standing at the rain-soaked, muddy gravesite, as did other tribal members before the grave was closed. Different tribal members stepped to the fore to perform rituals that included songs, bell ringing, burning of sweet grass and drumming.

anthrocentric:

Remains of ancient child ceremoniously reburied

WILSALL — On a sagebrush hillside in the Shields River Valley, close to the hem of the Crazy Mountains, the 12,600-year old remains of an infant boy were ceremoniously reburied on Saturday morning by American Indian tribal members.

The boy was between 1 year and 18 months old when he died of an unknown cause in an age of mammoth hunters.

“I hope that this is the final closure for you, too, as it is for us,” said Crow tribal elder Thomas Larson Medicine Horse Sr., addressing the Anzick family on whose property the child was discovered.

He spoke while standing at the rain-soaked, muddy gravesite, as did other tribal members before the grave was closed. Different tribal members stepped to the fore to perform rituals that included songs, bell ringing, burning of sweet grass and drumming.

hatirlamak:

Hemshinli of Rize | Charles Roffey 

In the latter half of the eighth century, and for a hundred years before that (and a hundred years after), Armenia was an emirate—a satellite state of the Islamic caliphates: first the Rashidun, then the Umayyad, and finally the Abbasid. Armenia was conquered and brought under Arab rule in 645 C.E.—this meant, among other things, that its Christian inhabitants (the vast majority of the Armenian population at that time) paid jizya, a special tax levied on kafirs, or non-Muslims. 

Jizya—or, perhaps, Arab domination itself—did not sit well with the Amatunis, a noble Armenian family from Vaspurakan, who abandoned their homeland for the Black Sea region when it became clear that the Arabs did not plan on decamping any time soon. There, they established the Principality of Hamamshen, an autonomous nation that remained independent until the arrival of the Ottomans in the fourteenth century. 

Over time, after prolonged separation from the Armenians of Armenia proper, the Armenians of Hamamshen became the Hemshin, a distinct ethnic group that later adopted Islam and forgot entirely its Armenian origins. The Hemshin peoples—the Hemshinli of Hemşin, the Hopa Hemshinli of Artvin, and the Christian Homshentsik of the Russian Caucasus—are considered by modern Armenians a lost Armenian people. Among the Hemshin themselves, no such consensus exists—the Hopa Hemshinli and the Homshentsik have been surprised to discover that Armenian outsiders understand their Homshetsma, in fact a dialect of western Armenian. In her documentary The Hamshen Community at the Crossroads of Past and Present, Lucine Sahakyan examines the unwillingness of the Hemshin to acknowledge their Armenian heritage.

The Hemshinli of Hemşin, Rize, are perhaps the most acculturated of the Hemshin peoples. They are Sunni Muslims, and unlike the Hopa Hemshinli and the Homshentsik, they do not speak Homshetsma but Turkish, exclusively. In these photographs, Hemshinli women pick and harvest tea. It is their staple crop (it replaced maize as the most profitable agricultural product in the 1990s), and, according to Erhan Ersoy, author of Social and economic structures of the Hemshin people in Çamlıhemşin, an essay included in The Hemshin: History, society, and identity in the Highlands of Northeast Turkey, edited by Hovann H. Simonian, ”to a large extent, it is the women who are responsible for [tea cultivation] and animal husbandry.”

Cultivation of tea in Çamlıhemşin began at the end of the 1960s and the beginning of the 1970s. Of the twenty-four villages in the region, nineteen are engaged in the cultivation of tea… The main unit of production in the cultivation of tea is the family; small-scale cultivation is typical for the Rize region…

Although the great majority of the labour required for tea cultivation is carried out by women (80 percent…), a major part of the income generated is retained by men (around 60 per cent). The heads of households tend to say that the income from tea is so small as to be insignificant, adding that it is typically used to buy small things for the house or is split up among the women of the house, who usually use it to buy gold.

Ersoy explains that “the patriarchal family system is dominant in the region, and so the eldest male is the head of the household. The eldest woman in the household also enjoys high status. The term koçira among the Hemshinli is used to a describe a woman who performs a managerial function within the home rather than carrying out household duties. Elderly women,” he continues, “do not lose this status when their sons become adults, though as a general rule it is considered important that women obey the male head of the household. For women this is an inescapable rule, and for this reason it is women who do most of the heavy work like carrying loads.”

One Hemshinli woman said, “Only mothers bear all the burdens. Mothers who make their husbands bear a burden are considered dishonourable among the people. This tradition is still in force in the Hemshin region. The woman bears the burden of the whole family.”

The identity of the Hemshin peoples remains complicated, but that is not their primary concern. Compared to neighboring Laz villages, Hemshin villages are built at higher altitudes and are less suitable to tea cultivation; in 90% of households, at least one family member was forced to seek work outside of the village, most likely in the big city, in order to support their traditionally large families; women remain subject to the will of men while working harder than men do—these, and not the issue of Armenian heritage, remain the most pressing problems of the Hemshin peoples. 

States of India

inspired by [x]

(Source: prince-doran)

In looking back over history before 1945 it would be difficult to imagine a more homogeneous and united nation than Korea. Whatever Koreans’ differences in caste or class, they are of the same culture (with minor north— south variations) throughout the peninsula, and the Korean language—Hangul—is universal.

[…]

Thus it was one of the great ironies of fate that two obscure US officials would casually segment this almost uniquely unified nation on the eve of Korea’s liberation from a hateful state of colonial vassalage. This cruel division, still in effect after half a century, was hardened by a bloody and destructive three-year war. And it is the final irony of Korean history that this conflict would be termed by some scholars a “civil war”.

Stanely Sandler, Korean War: An Interpretative History (via tw-koreanhistory)