posts tagged "world"

micdotcom:

You’d never see this side of Mexico in the media

The images pieced together in the news — of corruption, poverty, violence and crime — are grim, but they don’t capture the full, textured reality of life in Mexico. As there are approximately 33.7 million Mexican-Americans living in the United States today, it is worth thinking more about what the country looks like beyond the headlines. 

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yearsoflivingdangerously:

This comic was produced in partnership by Years of Living Dangerously and Symbolia Magazine. For more amazing real life comics, get Symbolia on your iPad or via PDF. And for more information on the biggest story of our time - check out YEARS.

Archaeologists find bizarre burials in Burnt City

archaeologicalnews:

image

TEHRAN — An archaeological team, which has been assigned to reconstruct the ancient society of the 5200-year-old Burnt City in a new research project, have found several bizarre burials.

“From 1200 graves, which have been discovered in the Burnt City since 1975 during various archaeological excavations, there are several burials which are very odd and mysterious,” team director Seyyed Mansur Sajjadi told the Persian service of CHN on Monday.

Located 57 kilometers from the Iranian town of Zabol in Sistan-Baluchestan Province, the Burnt City was excavated for the first time by the Istituto Italiano per l’Africa e l’Oriente (IsIAO) team led by Maurizio Tosi in 1967. The team conducted nine seasons of excavations until 1978. Read more.

nubbsgalore:

photos by gerry ellis from the david sheldrick wildlife trust, a nursery and orphanage for elephants in kenya’s tsavo east national park. here, fifty five keepers are charged with being around the clock parents to an elephant. the elephants, however, are the ones who chose their caretakers; it is the keepers who must ingratiate themselves to the elephants and earn their trust.

when elephants first arrive at the orphanage they are often traumatized from having witnessed the slaughter of their mothers and family by poachers. grieving can last several months, and they often lose the will to live. but as dame daphne sheldrick, founder of the orphanage, explains, a caretaker is charged with “persuading an elephant to live when it wants to die.”

approximately 35,000 elephants are killed by humans every year. with an estimated 350,000 elephants left in the whole continent of africa, they will be gone in the wild within ten years.

cbc’s the nature of things did a program on the elephants and their caretakers. you can foster an elephant with the david sheldrick wildlife trust online here. for more on the emotional lives of elephants, as well as the david sheldrick wildlife trust and other human efforts to save them, check out these posts

flatbear:

sigridellis:

satedanbadass:

Jason Momoa and Manu Bennett at Florida Super Con

Those two are both Maori, right? And they are goofily pulling semi-haka-referential moves in these photos, right?

Jason Momoa is Hawaiian, raised in Iowa. Manu Bennet is Australian/Maori (Ngāti Kahungunu and Te Arawa, which is tangentially related to my Iwi).

Manu in particular is referring some classic intimidation poses, especially the tongue (A lot of Maori tribes have a cool genetic trait where the connective skin underneath their tongue is much smaller, or not there at all, to further the intimidation. Mine goes out super far!), and Jason could be doing the same, or referring to native Hawaiian intimidation poses, which I am not familiar with.

A lot of the pacific island cultures are connected and have their own Hakas, Samoan, Fijian, Vanuatan, Tongan and more, all with different names. The one Manu is most likely referencing is Ka Mate, Te Rauparaha’s Haka (also my Iwi/tribe!), the most well known one, which looks like this.

This has been your daily dose of OH MY GOD SOMEONE IS TALKING ABOUT MY TINY COUNTRY LET ME IMMEDIATELY TELL YOU EVERYTHING I KNOW.

micdotcom:

7 huge problems left by the World Cup in Brazil

 The long list of controversies before the tournament’s start included mass evictions, violent protests, police brutality and construction worker deaths. But now that the party is over, the buzz about the games is mostly good, and the problems that the media once covered with such concern are slowly being swept under the rug. 

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awkwardsituationist:

thirteen year old ashol pan is part of a nascent movement of girls who are keeping alive the six thousand year old kazakh tradition of golden eagle hunting known as berkutchy.

though long the monopoly of boys — once deemed uniquely strong enough to carry a full grown eagle on their arms and endure harsh winter hunts — fewer are now learning the skill, abandoning their traditional semi nomadic ways for life in the cities.

berkutchy is a life long profession, and is often a hereditary one. but ashol’s brother left for the military, leaving her father, an experienced eagle hunter, to ask if she would take his place and assume training.

asher svidensky — who took these photos during a four month trek in the mountains of western mongolia’s bayan ulgii (or “rich cradle”) province, where only 250 hunters remain — told the bbc that where most boys are at first apprehensive around their eagles, ashol was very much at ease.

ashol, though still in school, will spend much of her time nurturing her eagle, imprinting herself on the fiercely independent bird from birth. after much time and training, her eagle — who is considered a member of the family — will learn to track down rabbits, foxes and wolves, whose fur is needed for the harsh winters.

koreaunderground:

Koreans were included in the controversial Yasukuni shrine without family permission, their descendents want them out

“This person has been waiting for seventy years. Why are you doing this?”
“Since we are the defendants and you are the plaintiff in an ongoing trial, we are unable to give an interview,” a representative for Yasukuni Shrine said.
It was 11 am on July 10, and a group of Koreans was standing in front of the gate to the Yasukuni Shrine in Tokyo. Facing firm resistance of the shrine’s employees, Park Nam-soon, 71, and those who were with her were unable to advance any further. Park had come to the shrine to find out how her father had been forcibly enshrined there.
Park and her family members desperately want to know why their father’s name had been listed at the shrine without permission from the family in advance or even notifying them after the fact, but these questions bounced off the wall of the shrine and lingered in the air. The shrine maintains that it cannot discuss matters that are currently under trial.
“The family members have come all the way from Korea. Why don’t you answer them with a little more respect?” said Akihiko Oguchi, venting his frustration, but in the end he could not change the shrine’s stubborn position. Oguchi is the attorney representing the plaintiffs suing to have their relatives’ names removed from Yasukuni Shrine.
[read more]

koreaunderground:

Koreans were included in the controversial Yasukuni shrine without family permission, their descendents want them out

“This person has been waiting for seventy years. Why are you doing this?”

“Since we are the defendants and you are the plaintiff in an ongoing trial, we are unable to give an interview,” a representative for Yasukuni Shrine said.

It was 11 am on July 10, and a group of Koreans was standing in front of the gate to the Yasukuni Shrine in Tokyo. Facing firm resistance of the shrine’s employees, Park Nam-soon, 71, and those who were with her were unable to advance any further. Park had come to the shrine to find out how her father had been forcibly enshrined there.

Park and her family members desperately want to know why their father’s name had been listed at the shrine without permission from the family in advance or even notifying them after the fact, but these questions bounced off the wall of the shrine and lingered in the air. The shrine maintains that it cannot discuss matters that are currently under trial.

“The family members have come all the way from Korea. Why don’t you answer them with a little more respect?” said Akihiko Oguchi, venting his frustration, but in the end he could not change the shrine’s stubborn position. Oguchi is the attorney representing the plaintiffs suing to have their relatives’ names removed from Yasukuni Shrine.

[read more]