posts tagged "world"

unconsumption:


The cost of building new classrooms and schools shouldn’t prohibit students in the developing world from accessing a quality education, but new construction, even using inexpensive materials like cinder block, can run up a five-digit bill in construction costs. Now, Hug It Forward, a nonprofit in Guatemala, has figured out how to build new schools on a shoestring budget by turning the plastic bottles that litter the countryside’s villages into raw construction materials.
A plastic school might sound like it’s better suited for Barbies than for people, but the technology—developed by the Guatemalan nonprofit Pura Vida—is actually quite clever and allows for schools to be built for less than $10,000. The plastic bottles are stuffed with trash, tucked between supportive chicken wire, and coated in layers of concrete to form walls between the framing. The bottles make up the insulation, while more structurally sound materials like wood posts are used for the framing.

More: Guatemalan Schools Built from Bottles, Not Bricks Plastic Bottle School’s A Cheap Alternative in Guatemala

pura vida is based in san marcos, lake atitlan, and most of my housemates in santiago did work for them on some of these houses. it’s a locally pushed and supported project, and they love for volunteers to come out and help! 

unconsumption:

The cost of building new classrooms and schools shouldn’t prohibit students in the developing world from accessing a quality education, but new construction, even using inexpensive materials like cinder block, can run up a five-digit bill in construction costs. Now, Hug It Forward, a nonprofit in Guatemala, has figured out how to build new schools on a shoestring budget by turning the plastic bottles that litter the countryside’s villages into raw construction materials.

A plastic school might sound like it’s better suited for Barbies than for people, but the technology—developed by the Guatemalan nonprofit Pura Vida—is actually quite clever and allows for schools to be built for less than $10,000. The plastic bottles are stuffed with trash, tucked between supportive chicken wire, and coated in layers of concrete to form walls between the framing. The bottles make up the insulation, while more structurally sound materials like wood posts are used for the framing.

More: Guatemalan Schools Built from Bottles, Not Bricks Plastic Bottle School’s A Cheap Alternative in Guatemala

pura vida is based in san marcos, lake atitlan, and most of my housemates in santiago did work for them on some of these houses. it’s a locally pushed and supported project, and they love for volunteers to come out and help! 

tw-koreanhistory:

The Balangiga Bell, on display at the 2nd ID Museum at Camp Red Cloud, South Korea.

Please can we have our bells back? Philippine town asks U.S.

In the devastated coastal Philippine town of Balangiga, a Roman Catholic belfry with a maroon steeple rises from the rubble, a battered symbol of resistance for a people with mixed feelings about the U.S. military now helping them survive.

After one of the world’s most powerful typhoons roared across the central Philippines and killed more than 4,000 people, U.S. military helicopters are flying in aid to desperate regions such as this once-picturesque fishing village of 12,600 people in ravaged Samar province.

It was here 112 years ago that one of the darkest chapters of American colonialism began: the island-wide massacre by U.S. soldiers of thousands of Filipinos, including women and children, in response to the killing of 48 U.S. soldiers by rebels.

After months of bloodshed, animosity has festered for more than a century over the ultimate insult: seizure of the town’s church bells by U.S. troops. In recent years, the Philippine government has demanded their return.

Marciano Deladia, a chief aide to the mayor, and other residents are thankful for the U.S. packets of rice and other food. “But we want our bells back,” he said.

The town built the belfry in 1998 in the hope that the United States would return three bells it says were stolen as trophies during the 1899-1902 Philippine-American War. One is believed to have been rung to signal the start of the attack.

Two of the bells are at the Warren Air Force Base in Wyoming. The third is part of a travelling museum now at a base in South Korea.

The dispute over the Balangiga bells underscores the difficulty the United States will face in transforming goodwill over its aid to typhoon victims into a bigger military presence on the ground in the Philippines.

Although the two countries are close allies, mistrust still lingers over America’s previous role as the Philippines’ colonial master, as well as its longtime support for the brutal and kleptocratic regime of the former dictator Ferdinand Marcos.

The belfry is among just a few buildings still intact after Super Typhoon Haiyan killed 14 people in Balangiga, where a well-organized evacuation plan kept fatalities low.

"We don’t have any animosity against the American people," said Deladia, standing in front of a monument recreating the ambush of U.S. troops. But the bells, he said, are "part of our historical heritage".

Every September 28 the town re-enacts the 1901 Balangiga “incident” in which 48 occupying U.S. soldiers died in an ambush at the old church that triggered retaliation in which U.S. forces razed homes and killed thousands.

Read More: http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/11/21/us-philippines-typhoon-usa-idUSBRE9AK1CO20131121

Drones, Lasers Help Archaeologists Study Ancient Mayan Ruins

archaeologicalnews:

image

Archaeologists studying Mayan ruins have taken inspiration from nocturnal bats flying above, using drones to scan the ancient temples from an entirely new viewpoint. The remote-controlled quadcopters have proven so useful, in fact, that researchers have assembled enough footage to create a 3D model of the site hidden deep in the jungle.

Researchers from the University of California San Diego’s Qualcomm Institute coordinated with a team of archaeologists and drone experts to document the Mayan archaeological site of El Zotz in northern Guatemala. Remnants from the pre-Columbian civilization are still largely unexcavated in part because the best way to view the large stone structures in humid, forested jungle is by air. Read more.

Kingdom of Kush Iron Industry Works Discovered

archaeologicalnews:

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New techniques developed at the University of Brighton to help archaeologists ‘see’ underground are starting to unlock the industrial secrets of an ancient civilisation.

The UCL Qatar research, investigating the iron industries of the Kingdom of Kush in Sudan, is attempting to identify 2000-year-old iron production workshops.

Working with colleagues from UCL Qatar, Dr Chris Carey, University of Brighton Senior Lecturer, has applied novel methods that have enabled archaeologists to map structures and deposits deep underground.

These underground maps have been used to uncover an iron production workshop complete with furnaces that were part of the economic engine room of the kingdom, which ruled northern Sudan and at certain times parts of Egypt between the 9th century BC and the 4th century AD. Read more.

lord-kitschener:

For fuck’s sake, we could bring more attention to the incredible civilizations of Mali and Ghana, or bring less-known Black composers, especially because both of these things are ignored because of racism…oh wait, nah, let’s have yet another goddamn tantrum about how Beethoven and Cleopatra were totally 100% Black by modern USA standards, and Egyptian Arabs weren’t invented until the middle ages. 

☑ Justice Socialed

seriously though. the entire african continent has been a foundation of human civilization just about since human brains became an evolutionary focal point. there is so much to talk about that doesn’t involve gross ethnocentric simplification or just outright wrongness about entire civilizations and histories. here’s some starting points:

-the kingdom of punt (ancient somalia, one of egypt’s trading partners; more on the extensive history of advanced kingdoms and civilizations of somalia)
-the ghana empire, most likely responsible for the domestication of the camel and thus the shaping of hundreds of civilizations
-the empire of mali, an incredibly wealthy and advanced civilization (read up on musa i too)
-the djolof empire 
-the songhai empire, where people came from as far away as italy to trade and do business
-the sayfawa dynasty, one of the longest lived in human history, of nigeria.
-the nok culture, considered to be one of the most refined ancient cultures ever discovered, as evidenced by their art and production of terracotta. the nok also appear to have discovered iron smelting completely independently of any outside influence, or of an intermediate bronze period, which is incredible. 
-the ethiopian empire, which should frankly need no introduction to people interested in ancient african civilization. 

just… go from there. don’t just take for granted what tumblr tells you. read the rest of africa’s history. there are and have always been peoples on that continent that could run circles around the egyptians in terms of wealth, advancement, technology, and military might. ancient egypt was ancient egypt; ancient egyptians do not fit into current day western-centric racial categories, no matter what they may or may not have looked like. pretty much the entire rest of the world, including people currently living on the african continent, do not fit and do not want to fit those categories. africa is not and has never been some empty expanse of nothing but jungle and poverty. you do not need ancient egypt’s flash in the pan existence to make that true.

beautiful-basque-country:

Here is the second part of one of our most successful posts, “Folk Faces" by photographer Asier Bastida. These portraits are exhibited in the Bilbao underground stations to promote the 40th International Folkore Festival of Portugalete.

A-ma-zing work!

(Source: lacajagris.com)

historical-nonfiction:

Welcome to Derinkuyu, an underground city that once housed up to 20,000 people. In the Cappadocia region, famous for its cave dwellings and underground villages, Derinkuyu stands out for sheer size and complexity. Locals began digging in the 500s BCE. The city consists of over 600 doors, each of which can be closed from the inside. Each floor could be closed off as well. And just to make attacking completely impossible, the entire city was deliberately built without any logic. Its maze-like layout makes navigating the city nightmarish for unfamiliar invaders.

(Source: whenonearth.net)

daughtersofdig:

Meet The Generation Of Incredible Native American Women Fighting To Preserve Their Culture by Danielle Seewalker for Marie Claire UK

Native Americans represent just one per cent of the US population and some languages have only one speaker left. Now a new generation is fighting to preserve the culture.

Meet the women leading that fight: http://www.marieclaire.co.uk/blogs/547176/meet-the-generation-of-incredible-native-american-women-fighting-to-preserve-their-culture.html#y5UioxWL1hQHhom1.01

odditiesoflife:

The Ancient Town of Fenghuang, China

The town of Fenghuang is located in the Hunan province in China along the banks of the Tuo Jiang River. The town is exceptionally well-preserved and relatively untouched by modern urbanization.

The legacy of the Ming And Qing dynasties are preserved within the town, spanning 300 years of ancient heritage. In the ancient town zone, preservation of over 200 residential buildings, 30 streets, and hundreds of other ancient features and landmarks of the town has continued for hundreds of years.

Because of its unique geographical location, Fenghuang never suffered from the destruction of any natural disaster or suffered invasion from any wars. Even during the war of resistance against Japanese invasion, the isolated town of Fenghuang did not suffer occupation. In 1949, Fenghuang was peacefully liberated.

In the following 50 years, Fenghuang was spared any large-scale construction that occurred in nearby districts. As the people of Fenghuang cherish their valuable heritage, the local government has conducted strict control over all construction, continuing the preservation and the authenticity of the ancient town.

source