posts tagged "world"

englishsnow:

Ireland by florescent

valnon:

A 13-year-old eagle huntress in Mongolia
via BBC
Photos by Asher Svidensky, Article by William Kremer

Kazakh boys in western Mongolia start learning how to use the huge birds to hunt for foxes and hares at the age of 13, when the eagles sit heavily on their undeveloped arms. Svidensky, a photographer and travel writer, shot five boys learning the skill - and he also photographed Ashol-Pan. “To see her with the eagle was amazing,” he recalls. She was a lot more comfortable with it, a lot more powerful with it and a lot more at ease with it.”… He describes Ashol-Pan as a smiling, sweet and shy girl. His photographs of her engaging in what has been a male activity for around 2,000 years say something about Mongolia in the 21st Century.

The eagles are not bred in captivity, but taken from nests at a young age. Female eaglets are chosen since they grow to a larger size - a large adult might be as heavy as seven kilos, with a wingspan of over 230cm. After years of service, on a spring morning, a hunter releases his mature eagle a final time, leaving a butchered sheep on the mountain as a farewell present.

(More pictures and photos at the link.)

awkwardsituationist:

to mark world theatre day, held on march 27, one hundred young syrians from jordan’s zaatari refugee camp acted in an adapted production of king lear. the play — which tells a story of exile, of a ruler losing touch with reality, and of a land divided by rival groups — was directed was nawar bulbul (third photo), a popular syrian actor who fled his country after appearing in anti government protests.

"i wanted to show that these children are not worthless …that they have something real to contribute." he said. “the show is meant to bring back laughter, joy and humanity” and "help [the children] express themselves." the kids — all under the age of fifteen — were actively involved in the costuming, for example.

many of the children cried when they heard the applause of onlookers at the play’s end. said one child, “i do not feel lonely any more in this place.” their parents described the project as a rare point of light in a bleak camp existence. after the show, they boasted of their children’s talent.

the production, months in the planning, was also meant to help counteract the effects of a war that has caused young syrians to miss vital years of education. about 60,000 of the refugees at the zaatari camp are younger than eighteen, and fewer than a quarter regularly attend school. many fear the war is creating a lost generation of children.

photos are by warrick page for the new york times and jared kohler for unhcr. for more on syria’s refugee crisis, see #withsyria, care international, oxfam syria crisis appeal, human care syria and free syrian voices

(it’s interesting to note that shakespeare actually mentions the city of aleppo in macbeth, which serves as a reminder that syria is one of our oldest centers of civilization.)

mingsonjia:

冬日莫愁湖

Winter Scenery of Mochou Lake, Nanjing City, China 

Lençóis Maranhenses National Park in Brazil is mostly sand - but it regularly rains in the area, so water flows into its valleys, spotting the desert with pools of blue and green.

(Source: wnderlst)

europeanarchitecture:

Palazzo Farnese (Caprarola) - architect Jacopo Barozzi da Vignola, Caprarola, Italy (by alfiogreen)

Archaeologist reveals sustainable practices of the Haudenosaunee

archaeologicalnews:

image

Every longhouse hearth – every reworked brass kettle and fractured deer bone unearthed by Cornell archaeologist Kurt Jordan and his student diggers in 18th century Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) villages – tells a very different story.

At one time, mainstream scholars of pre-Revolutionary War Iroquoia saw the disease-diminished and war-weakened “people of the longhouse” fumbling through an epoch of social turmoil and decline. Jordan, his colleagues and their archaeological evidence just might be changing history.

"I see an active, engaged, re-energized people building a reasonably sustainable, localized economy in the face of tremendous pressure from European empires and Native rivals," says Jordan, associate professor of anthropology and American Indian studies. Read more.

androphilia:

Unprecedented images of Western people looking just like you and me | Karl reMarks

We have all wondered how Western people look like in everyday situations, behind the veil of exoticism that surrounds their mysterious culture. Photographer Adam Vaijan has spent years documenting everyday life in the West and the results are a startling mix of the magical and the ordinary. His beautiful shots allow us to see beyond the wall of myth that surrounds Western people and their culture, revealing scenes that are touching in their normality and reminding us that they are just like us.

androphilia:

Unprecedented images of Western people looking just like you and me | Karl reMarks

We have all wondered how Western people look like in everyday situations, behind the veil of exoticism that surrounds their mysterious culture. Photographer Adam Vaijan has spent years documenting everyday life in the West and the results are a startling mix of the magical and the ordinary. His beautiful shots allow us to see beyond the wall of myth that surrounds Western people and their culture, revealing scenes that are touching in their normality and reminding us that they are just like us.

okinawablue:

Yotsudake is one of the most exquisite of the classical Okinawan dances, with the dancers’ vibrant bingata kimono and the striking flower hat which have become iconic of Okinawan culture. The dance originates from the 16th or 17th century when the Ryukyu Kingdom had strong ties with China, and was traditionally performed as a warm welcome to the Chinese envoy. Today, it is performed to honor any happy event. These photos were taken during our SF Kenjin-kai New Year’s celebration (see previous post). Here’s a video of the dance being performed with live music at Shuri Castle during the Uchinanchu Festival.I urge you to play it while viewing my photos to experience the music and atmosphere. 

"Yotsudake" means "four bamboo," the name of the tasseled bamboo castanets the dancers play - a pair in each hand. These create a gentle, rhythmic clacking sound that accompanies the music. It seems simple but takes some practice to master these - they’re basically two large bamboo rectangles held by a cord that need to be clacked together at precise intervals and are awkward to hold.

The unique silk hat features a gold-trimmed design of a stylized lotus flower and ocean waves. It’s mesmerizing to watch one dancer on her own with her slow, graceful movements, and even more breathtaking to see five or six. Imagine observing forty or fifty of these dancers in perfect sync, which we had the opportunity to see many years ago at the Yomitan Festival. It was unforgettable, seeing these harmonious flowers swaying in time to the music, reminding us of the beauty, resilience and connectedness of all living things.

The main focus of these photos is my mother, Fumi Gibbons, who will be 83 this year. She’s been performing this dance with her friends for several years (my goal is to learn it from her). My niece Amalia helps her grandmother with her costume in the top photo. In the final photo, at the end of the performance, my mother is accosted by a very surprised friend who had no idea she knew how to dance. She kept exclaiming, “akisamiyo!” and even gave her a little slap on the cheek as if to make sure she was real.